Category Archives: General

Divine Strength

Category : General

1 Thessalonians 5:24 (KJV)
24 Faithful is he that calleth you, who also will do it.

It is noted, the reason why most Christians are not as happy as they might be, is this: they are looking for their proofs and encouragements in their own hearts, and not in God. The ultimate appeal, the true logic of the soul, the only resting-place, is here: God is God, and God is true. ‘Faithful is He that calleth you, Who also will do it.


In numerous places in His word God has promised to sanctify His followers, and His faithfulness binds Him to fulfill His promises; therefore, He will do it. However, the one who can believe will find this thing also possible to him.


This faithfulness is of Him “that calleth you.” It is a fidelity to His own gracious engagement. He without destroying human freedom or responsibility, of His free grace commences, continues and ends the whole Christian work. Yet so faithful is His compassion that He represents Himself as bound and tied to the impulses of His own unconstrained mercy. There is no bond but His own love, yet that bond is stronger than iron; and He, whom the universe cannot compel, commands Himself. The great achievement must ever remain the work of God.


The Divine faithfulness is gloriously characteristic of the spiritual system to which we belong. No words can go beyond the confidence of David in the faithfulness of God, and no doubt high and spiritual meanings belong to his expressions of such confidence. Holiness was to be the foundation of all, but yet a holiness triumphant in visible majesty and regal pomp. But the faithfulness of our text has exclusive reference to sanctification.


Let us remember it was not relief from temporal evils that Paul promised; the mercy of God might send them to the lions; it was still His mercy, if it but kept them un-spotted from the world. How many of us are content with such faithfulness as this? Is this the tenor of our prayers? Is our heart busy in pleading with God His own eternal faithfulness in behalf of our sanctification and spiritual safety?

Have a Great and God filled Day

Pastor C


The Law of Love–Kindness to ALL

Category : General

Romans 13:10 (KJV)
10 Love worketh no ill to his neighbour: therefore love is the fulfilling of the law.

It has been observed that “All disputes, then, among neighbors and among nations proceed from a want of love. What, then, shall we say of the morality of men in general, who live in strife and contention, as often as their interests in the smallest degree interfere? What is the origin of all the disputes in the world but a want of love? Therefore, love is the fulfilling of the law.”


Love would seek to do him good; of course, it would prevent all dishonesty and crime toward others. It would prompt to justice, truth, and benevolence. If this law were engraved on every man‘s heart, and practiced in his life, what a change would it immediately produce in society! If all people would at once “abandon” what is suited to “work ill” to others, what an influence would it have on the business and commercial affairs of people.


How many plans of fraud and dishonesty would it at once arrest? How many schemes would it crush? Commentators have noticed that love would silence the voice of the slanderer; it would stay the plans of the seducer and the adulterer; it would put an end to cheating, and fraud, and all schemes of dishonest gain. The gambler desires the property of his neighbor without any compensation; and thus works “ill” to him. The dealer in “lotteries” desires property for which he has never toiled, and which must be obtained at the expense and loss of others. And there are many “employments” all whose tendency is to work “ill” to a neighbor. This is pre-eminently true of the traffic in “ardent spirits.” It cannot do him good, and the almost uniform result is to deprive him of his property, health, reputation, peace, and domestic comfort.


He that sells his neighbor liquid fire, knowing what must be the result of it, is not pursuing a business which works no ill to him; and love to that neighbor would prompt him to abandon the traffic; Habakkuk 2:15, “Wo unto him that giveth his neighbor drink, that putteth thy bottle to him, and makest him drink also, that thou mayest look on their nakedness.”
We must not read it to mean that if a man has this principle of love firmly embedded in his nature, it will help him to keep the law, but that it is tantamount to the actual fulfillment of the law. The law being an expression of the mind and will of God, we have only to study the character of God more closely to interpret more correctly the spirit and intention of the law. The character of God is known to us by His works, His Providences, His revelations of Himself by prophets and saints, to whom He has made Himself known. Here we see how he demonstrates by the effect, that under the word love are contained those things which are taught us in all the commandments; for the one who is endued with true love will never entertain the thought of injuring others. What else does the whole law forbid, but that we do no harm to our neighbor? Everything, “Because” love does no harm to another, “therefore” the fulfilling of the Law, is implying that all that the Law requires is to have “love”; a pure and genuine love for others.

Have a Great and God filled Day

Pastor C


Our Priority–Pleasing God NOT man

Category : General

Acts 5: 29 (KJV)
29 Then Peter and the other apostles answered and said, We ought to obey God rather than men.

“If there be a God, and He has any will respecting our conduct, we ought to obey Him. We owe Him obedience on every account. He is our Maker, Proprietor, Benefactor, and a Being infinitely perfect, incapable of willing anything inconsistent with the strictest rectitude. We ought to obey Him. Ought we! Then why have we disobeyed Him? Out of thy own mouth will lie judge and condemn us”–Anonymous

As parent, we want to instill unquestioning obedience into our child(ren). Their safety and very life may depend on it. And God wants to instill the same kind of obedience, no matter what, into His children. Sometimes obeying God will not bring us into a place of safety, but rather, into danger and harm. But, as soldiers of the cross, we must be ready and willing to obey our Commander without question or complaint.

Our text follows on the story of two disobedient people whom God struck dead as a warning to the early church against the deadly sin of hypocrisy. Verses 12-16 show the church recovering from that frightening incident, reporting both the atmosphere in the church and in the surrounding community. No hypocrites dared to join them, for fear of being struck dead! And yet the Lord was adding many more—Luke has stopped counting—to the church. And the apostles were performing extraordinary miracles of healing and deliverance.


The same answer they gave before, Acts 4:19, founded on the same reason, which still stood good. We have received our commission from God; we dare not lay it down at the desire or command of men. The word “ought” is but an old past form of the verb “owe”; it is, in fact, but another spelling of “owed.” What, therefore, we ought to do, we owed to do; what we ought to be, are owed to be. To God we owe our lives; we ought to pay Him with our lives. What we owe to our fellow-man, is that which we owe it to God to do for an honoured creature of God. We ought to do it because we owe to do it. And yet we go on saying we ought to do and we ought to be, never thinking that what we ought we owe, and that what we owe we do not pay! (H. C. Trumbull, D. D.)


Therefore, this is the sum of their answer, it is lawful for them, nay, they ought to prefer God before men. God commands us to bear witness of Christ; therefore, it is in vain for you to command us to keep silence. But I have declared before in the third chapter, when this sentence taketh place, that we ought rather to obey God than men. God doth set men over us in such sort with power, that he keeps still his own authority safe and sound. Therefore, we must obey rulers so far, that the commandment of God be not broken. Whereas power and authority is lawfully used, then it is out of season to make comparison between God and man. Pleasing God is our out-most priority not pleasing man or ourselves!

Have a great and God filled day!

Pastor C


God on our Side

Category : General

Nehemiah 4: 14(KJV)
14 And I looked, and rose up, and said unto the nobles, and to the rulers, and to the rest of the people, Be not ye afraid of them: remember the LORD, which is great and terrible, and fight for your brethren, your sons, and your daughters, your wives, and your houses.

It was noted, “Always believe that God is on your side. “He is on the field when most invisible.” In one of the great continental cities the regalia are not kept behind iron bars as in the Tower of London, but lie upon an open table. It might appear an easy thing for some thief to snatch a diamond or a jewel from the glittering array, and yet no man dare put out his band to take one, for that table is charged with electricity, and woe to the person who touches it. The protection is complete; you cannot see it, but there it is. Only live in daily–hourly communion with Christ. Don’t break the spiritual connection, and you are as safe from Satan and sin as the jewels from the devices of the thief. Greater is He that is for us than all enemies that can be against us. (E. Abbott.)


Nehemiah offered prayer for them; pleaded with God against their enemies; and did all he could to encourage them. “Do not be afraid of the enemy! Remember the Lord, who is great and glorious, and fight for your brothers, your sons, your daughters, your wives, and your homes!” Better advice cannot be given us. We are apt to remember what is calculated to discourage us, cast us down, or produce improper feelings within us.
We must realize that as servants should “remember the Lord,” that He “took upon Him the form of a servant.” Conclusion: Remember the promises He has made, the deliverance He has wrought, the blessings He has conferred, the invitations He has given, and the relations He now fills. Remember Him–in calamity to trust Him, in prosperity to praise Him, in danger to call upon Him, in difficulty to expect His interference. Remember Him, for it is your duty, it is your privilege. Remember Him, for He never forgets you.

Have a great and God filled day!

Pastor C


The New You in Christ

Category : General

Ephesians 4: 24 (KJV)
24And that ye put on the new man, which after God is created in righteousness and true holiness..

It is noted, “Get a new nature; for in Christ Jesus – under the Christian dispensation, neither circumcision avails anything, nor non-circumcision, hut a new creation. Therefore, ye must be renewed in the spirit of your mind.”
Here is certainly an allusion to the creation of man. Moses tells us, Genesis 1:27, that God created man in his own image; that is, God was the model according to which he was formed in the spirit of his mind. St. Paul says here that they should put on the new man, which after God is created in righteousness and true holiness, or, in the holiness of truth. Both certainly refer to the same thing, and the one illustrates the other. From the apostle we learn what Moses meant by the image of God; it was righteousness and the truth of holiness. It is not this or the other degree of moral good which the soul is to receive by Jesus Christ, it is the whole image of God; it is to be formed, according to God; the likeness of the Divine Being is to be traced upon his soul, and he is to bear that as fully as his first father Adam bore it in the beginning.


The new man refers to the renovated nature. This is called in other places, the “new creature, or the new creation” (2 Corinthians 5:17), and refers to the condition after the heart is changed. The change is so great, that there is no impropriety in speaking of one who has experienced it as “a new man.” He has new feelings, principles, and desires. He has laid aside his old principles and practices, and, in everything that pertains to moral character, he is new. His body is indeed the same; the intellectual structure of his mind the same; but there has been a change in his principles and feelings which make him, in all the great purposes of life, a new being.
Let us learn, that regeneration is not a trifling change. It is not a mere change of relations, or of the outward condition. It is not merely being brought from the world into the church, and being baptized, though by the most holy hands; it is much more. None of these things would make proper the declaration, “he is a new man.” Regeneration by the Spirit of God does. The idea is, evidently, that man is so renewed as to become “like” God, or the divine image is restored to the soul. In the parallel passage in Colossians 3:9, the idea is expressed more fully, “renewed in knowledge after “the image” of him that created him.” Man, by regeneration, is restored to the lost image of God. Let us learn the incompleteness and monstrosity of a professed belief in the truth which does not produce this righteousness and holiness. The new me is renewed in Christ and reflect Christ in everything I do or say!

Have a Great and God filled Day

Pastor C


You are not Forsaken or Forgotten

Category : General

Psalm 4: 1 (KJV)
1Hear me when I call, O God of my righteousness: thou hast enlarged me when I was in distress; have mercy upon me, and hear my prayer.

No man has a right to expect God to hear him if he does not call. Indeed, how shall he be heard if he does not speak? There are multitudes who expect the blessings of God as confidently as if they had prayed for them most fervently; and yet such people pray not at all.


This Psalms opens with prayer, then an address showing the folly, as well as danger, of pursuing vanity; the close of the Psalm determines that the happiness of man must be alone found in the favor of God. When I pray. The word “hear” in such cases is always used in the sense of “listen to,” “hear favorably,” or “attend to;” hence, in the literal sense it is always true that God “hears” all that is said. The meaning is, “hear and answer me,” or grant me what I ask. The “my God” is here rendered more definite, by an additional word. The Psalmist indicates that he expected help, not on account of any partial predilection entertained for him by God, but from his God being the Righteous One, who could not but afford aid to His righteous cause. In this he supplies a rule for every prayer in like extremities. To beg help, without being able thus to designate God, is equivalent to blasphemy. For, instead of wishing God to act according to His nature, one then wishes Him to deny His nature.

This is the dual petition which is the burden of this chapter. Note that the worshipper does not plead any merit or worthiness of his own but bases his petition upon the mercy of God. In these words, there is shown the faith of David, who, although brought to the uttermost distress, and indeed almost consumed by a long series of calamities, did not sink under his sorrow; nor was he so broken in heart as to be prevented from betaking himself to God his deliverer. By his praying, he testified, that when utterly deprived of all earthly succor, there yet remained for him hope in God. Moreover, he calls Him the God of his righteousness, which is the same thing as if he had called Him the Vindicator of his right; and he appeals to God, because all men everywhere condemned him, and his innocence was borne down by the slanderous reports of his enemies and the perverse judgments of the common people. And this cruel and unjust treatment which David met with, ought to be carefully marked. For while nothing is more painful to us than to be falsely condemned, and to endure, at one and the same time, wrongful violence and slander; yet to be ill spoken of for doing well, is an affliction which daily befalls the saints. And it becomes them to be so exercised under it as to turn away from all the enticements of the world, and to depend wholly upon God alone.


“The church, like David,” says Dr. Horne, and, we may add, every true member thereof, “calls aloud for God’s assistance; addresses Him as the God of her righteousness, as the fountain of pardon and grace. This reminds us of that spiritual liberty, and enlargement from bondage, which God has purchased for her, and oftentimes wrought in her; and conscious of her demerit, makes her prayer for mercy.” The Christian has an equally great joy. He can say that Christ has been made to him righteousness, that we have been ‘made the righteousness of God in Him’ (1 Corinthians 1:30; 2 Corinthians 5:21). This is a strong reminder that no matter what we are going through, we are never alone. Though God may seem distant, He is always near.

Have a Great and God filled Day

Pastor C


Keep our Eyes on Christ

Category : General

James 5: 16 (KJV)
16 Confess your faults one to another, and pray one for another, that ye may be healed. The effectual fervent prayer of a righteous man availeth much.

We all know life is and can be hard sometimes, and many would be in agreement with me. Too many have had their bout with discouragement and disappointment, which they see no help in sight. The reality is that this pair of twins often go hand in hand for me. It often starts with a disappointment and then spirals down into discouragement that is often hard to get past. This is a scheme used by satan with all of us as he knows that when we are discouraged, we will not be the men and women that God desires us to be.

It is of great importance for us to know when God designs to do some particular work in his Church, He pours out on His followers the spirit of grace and supplication; and this He does sometimes when He is about to do some especial work for an individual. When such a power of prayer is granted, faith should be immediately called into exercise, that the blessing may be given: the spirit of prayer is the proof that the power of God is present to heal.


However, we must note, as is pointed out, that it is not any man’s prayer; not the prayer of a profane sinner, for God heareth not sinners; nor of hypocrites and formal professors: but of the righteous man, who is justified by the righteousness of Christ, and has the truth of grace in him, and lives soberly and righteously; for a righteous man often designs a good man, a gracious man, one that is sincere and upright, as Job, Joseph of Arimathea, and others; though not without sin, as the person instanced in the following verse shows; “Elias, who was a man of like passions”, but a just man, and his prayer was prevalent: and not any prayer of a righteous man is of avail, but that which is “effectual, fervent”; that has power, and energy, and life in it; which is with the Spirit, and with the understanding, with the heart, even with a true heart, and in faith; and which is put up with fervency, and not in a cold, lukewarm, lifeless, formal, and customary way: that prayer which is constant and continual, and without ceasing, and is importunate; this prevails and succeeds, as the parable of the widow and the unjust judge shows. Let us always remember when discouragement and disappointment comes to keep our eyes on Christ, the Savior and Sustainer of our soul.

Have a great and God filled day!

Pastor C


Cry out to Jesus

Category : General

Psalm 28: 2 (KJV)
2 Hear the voice of my supplications, when I cry unto thee, when I lift up my hands toward thy holy oracle.

“We are taught in Scripture to be persistent in prayer, but that is not all. Our persistence must be focused—it must have a point. We need to know what we want. And it would be far better to receive a thousand no’s in a row than to pray constantly in a nebulous fashion.” — anonymous

David used the poetic technique of repetition and parallelism to say essentially the same thing in two ways. His prayer was a cry to God; and his body was set in the traditional posture of prayer. It has been observed that “Psalms 28:1-2, is a prelude to the prayer proper, on the double ground of his helplessness apart from God, and of his lifting up his hands in prayer.” David is in such danger that unless God hears him, he will lose his life. “Hands lifted up in prayer can be expressive of prayer in many moods, such as calling down the power of heaven upon others as in Exodus 17:9-.” Paul also associated this action with prayer in 1 Timothy 2:8.

This repetition is a sign of a heart in anguish. David’s ardor and vehemence in prayer are also intimated by the noun signifying voice, and the verb signifying to cry. He means that he was so stricken with anxiety and fear, that he prayed not coldly, but with burning, vehement desire, like those who, under the pressure of grief, vehemently cry out. It has been a common practice in all ages for men to lift up their hands in prayer. Nature has extorted this gesture even from heathen idolaters, to show by a visible sign that their minds were directed to God alone. This was a type of Christ, and it is to him that we must lift up our eyes and hands, for through him all good comes from God to us. It was also a figure of heaven, Hebrews 9:24. And from God, as our Father in heaven, we are taught to expect an answer to our prayers.

Here we come to acknowledges that the only reason he can come before God is that he has been redeemed by a sacrifice and forgiven. He is remembering that sacrifice by turning to the Holy of Holies. Are we this desperate for the Word of God? Are we longing for Him to speak to us? Do we dig into the Word of God, labor in prayer? Do we act as though our spiritual life depended on it? Jesus taught us that it does. Now the only way that we can come in prayer and gain access to God is through the blood of Christ.

Like David, let us understand, then, clung to the sanctuary with no other view than that by the help of God’s promise He will never leave nor forsake, that we must cast all our cares on Him because He cares for us and wants to rise us above the elements of the world.

Have a great and God filled day!

Pastor C


Continuous Trust in Jehovah

Category : General

Psalm 62: 8 (KJV)
8Trust in him at all times; ye people, pour out your heart before him: God is a refuge for us. Selah

A beautiful refrain is this to our life-song, “Trust in Him at all times”–in youth, in age, in sorrow, in joy, in poverty, in wealth; at all times, in good harvests and in bad harvests, in the wilderness and in the garden, on the firm earth and on the tumultuous sea; at all times, until time itself has mingled with eternity. (J. Parker, D. D.)

This exhortation which can be viewed in a general sense addressed to all persons, in all circumstances, and at all times, is founded on the personal experience of the psalmist, and on the views which he had of the character of God, as worthy of universal confidence. David had found him worthy of such confidence; he now exhorts all others to make the same trial, and to put their trust in God in like manner. What he had found God to be, all others would find him to be. His own experience of God‘s goodness and mercy – of his gracious interposition in the time of trouble – had been such that he could confidently exhort all others, in similar circumstances, to make the same trial of his love. may be granted. It is desirable that this state of mind should be produced; and when it is produced, the prayer is answered.


However, the address here is to his loyal subjects, who had been faint hearten. He exhorts them to trust only and fully in God. As a military order it was worthy this unequaled theocratic sovereign, and was more effective, morally, at this hour, than the loudest preaching.


The idea is, that the heart becomes tender and soft, so that its feelings and desires flow out as water, and all its emotions, all its wishes, its sorrows, its troubles, are poured out before God. All that is in our hearts may be made known to God. There is not a desire which he cannot gratify; not a trouble in which he cannot relieve us; not a danger in which he cannot defend us. And, in like manner there is not a spiritual want in which he will not feel a deep interest, nor a danger to our souls from which he will not be ready to deliver us. Much more freely than to any earthly parent – to a father, or even to a mother – may we make mention of all our troubles, little or great, before God.


This is a source of encouragement to and for us by the psalmist example. We need to look, listen and learn to trust in God. Pour out our heart before him. We are to make known to him all the desires, cares, and griefs of our hearts freely and frequently, with confident expectation of obtaining what we want or desire from Him. God is a refuge for us and not only, my refuge, Psalms 62:7, but a refuge for us all, even as many as will flee to Him, and take shelter in Him.

Have a great and God filled day!

Pastor C


Commitment to Motherhood

Category : General

Judges 5: 7 (KJV)
7 The inhabitants of the villages ceased, they ceased in Israel, until that I Deborah arose, that I arose a mother in Israel.

To be a mother is by no means second class. Men may have the authority in the home, but the women have the influence. The mother, more than the father, is the one who molds and shapes those little lives from day one. ~ John MacArthur


Until it pleased God to raise up Deborah, and endow her in a very wonderful and extraordinary manner with gifts qualifying her to be a nursing mother to Israel, to teach and instruct them in the mind and will of God, to administer judgement and justice to them, to protect and defend them, and in all which she discovered a maternal affection for them; and as a good judge and ruler of a people may be called the father of them, so she, being a woman, is with propriety called a mother in Israel, having an affectionate concern for them as her children: now, till she arose, there was no perfect salvation and deliverance wrought for them, since the death of Ehud, even throughout the days of Shamgar and Jael; which is observed to excite praise and thankfulness on the present occasion, which hereby became the more illustrious.


As been pointed out over and has been concluded, “We need that womanly element in the Church. The mother is the soul of the family. We cannot live upon hard law and severe discipline; there must always be a tender element in our education, for we are weak, and need the ministry of compassion and love. We speak much about the fathers of the Church, and the fathers of the nation, and are apt to forget that the “mothers in Israel” have often been more heroic than the fathers, and that their very gentleness has become their strength in time of danger. Whilst discouraging some aspects of what are termed sisterhoods, and whilst deprecating what is known as the worship of the Virgin Mother, we should seek for the truth which underlies all this womanly ministry. Many could serve the Church by miracles of love, patience, compassion, and encouragement, whose voice could never be heard on public questions. Every woman can at least be “a mother in Israel” within the limits of her own family. She is not called upon to be a theologian, a scholar, a pedant, a source of alarm to the ignorant and the incompetent, but she is called upon to be compassionate, sympathetic, and encouraging. It is a mistake to suppose that the Church is either a drill-ground or a school alone. It is a house, a home, a nursery; it is a place of healing, education, and comfort; many a strong man would be the better if to all his strength he added a touch of tenderness. Beautiful is the service of mothers in the Church of Christ. They can speak with an influence all their own, absolutely indisputable, even by the most learned and eloquent men. They know how to whisper to sorrow, how to touch weakness without burdening it, how to speak a word in season to him that is weary. All womanly influence in the Church and in the family should be abundantly and gratefully encouraged.”

Have a great and God filled day!

Pastor C