Monthly Archives: April 2019

Revolving Trust

Category : General

Psalm 62: 8 (KJV)
8Trust in him at all times; ye people, pour out your heart before him: God is a refuge for us. Selah.

There is not a desire which he cannot gratify; not a trouble in which he cannot relieve us; not a danger in which he cannot defend us. And, in like manner there is not a spiritual want in which he will not feel a deep interest, nor a danger to our souls from which he will not be ready to deliver us. Much more freely than to any earthly parent – to a father, or even to a mother – may we make mention of all our troubles, little or great, before God.


This exhortation, addressed to all persons, in all circumstances, and at all times, is founded on the personal experience of the psalmist, and on the views which he had of the character of God, as worthy of universal confidence. David had found him worthy of such confidence; he now exhorts all others to make the same trial, and to put their trust in God in like manner. What he had found God to be, all others would find him to be. His own experience of God‘s goodness and mercy – of his gracious interposition in the time of trouble – had been such that he could confidently exhort all others, in similar circumstances, to make the same trial of his love.


The emphasis must be put upon the continuousness of the trust. We are called upon to trust God where we cannot praise Him. It is in the Garden of Gethsemane that we can best show the reality and force of our trust in God. Even unbelievers may laugh at times, and fools be glad in the time of abounding harvest; however, only the one who lovingly trusts in God can be calm in the darkness, and sing songs of trust when the fig tree does not flourish. It is said that trust of this kind amounts to an argument. It compels the attention of those who study the temper and action of our lives. Naturally they ask how it is that we are so sustained and comforted, and that when other men are complaining and repining we can repeat our prayer and sing the same song of trust, though sometimes, indeed, in a lower tone. We are watched when we stand by the graveside, and if our Christian faith can overcome human sorrow a tribute of praise is due to our principles. And many men may be prepared to render that tribute, and so bring themselves nearer to the kingdom of God. A beautiful refrain is this to our life-song, “Trust in Him at all times”–in youth, in age, in sorrow, in joy, in poverty, in wealth; at all times, in good harvests and in bad harvests, in the wilderness and in the garden, on the firm earth and on the tumultuous sea; at all times, until time itself has mingled with eternity.


This is our privilege, that we may pour out our hearts before God. Pour out our heart in personal prayer and supplication. God sees the heart; yet we need to open it ourselves to Him. Spread our case before Him. It will be our comfort and relief, our solace and our satisfaction.

Have a Great and God filled Day

Pastor C


Walking as a Renewed man

Category : General

Ephesians 4: 17 (KJV)
17This I say therefore, and testify in the Lord, that ye henceforth walk not as other Gentiles walk, in the vanity of their mind,

The object of this is, to exhort them to walk worthy of their high calling, and to adorn the doctrine of the Savior. With this view, Paul reminds them of what they were before they were converted, and of the manner in which the pagan around them lived. He was reminding them that they are called to holiness by the Gospel, the other Gentiles have no such calling; walk not as they walk. In this and the two following verses the apostle gives a most awful account of the conduct of the heathens who were without the knowledge of the true God. I shall note the particulars.


The same is true that every natural man walks in a vain show; the mind of man is vain, and whoever walk according to the dictates of it, must walk vainly: the phrase is expressive of the emptiness of the mind; it being naturally destitute of God, of the knowledge, fear, and grace of God; and of Jesus Christ, of the knowledge of him, faith in him, and love to him; and of the Spirit and his graces; and it also points at the instability and changeableness of the human mind, in which sense man at his best estate was altogether vanity; as also the folly, falsehood, and wickedness of it in his fallen state: and the mind discovers its vanity in its thoughts and imaginations, which are vain and foolish; in the happiness it proposes to itself, which lies in vain things, as worldly riches, honors, and in the ways and means it takes to obtain it, and in words and actions; and the Gentiles showed the vanity of their minds in their vain philosophy and curious inquiries into things, and in their polytheism and idolatry: to walk herein, is to act according to the dictates of a vain and carnal mind; and it denotes a continued series of sinning, or a vain conversation maintained, a progress and obstinate persisting therein with pleasure. Now God’s elect before conversion walked as others do, but when they are converted their walk and conversation is not, at least it ought not to be, like that of those who are not converted.

Have a Great and God filled Day

Pastor C


Having a Desire for God

Category : General

Psalm 34: 8 (KJV)
8 O taste and see that the LORD is good: blessed is the man that trusteth in him.

In this verse the Psalmist indirectly reproves men for their dullness in not perceiving the goodness of God, which ought to be to them more than matter of simple knowledge. By the word taste he at once shows that they are without taste; and at the same time, he assigns the reason of this to be, that they devour the gifts of God without relishing them, or through a vitiated loathing ungratefully conceal them. He, therefore, calls upon them to stir up their senses, and to bring a palate endued with some capacity of tasting, that God’s goodness may become known to them, or rather, be made manifest to them.


What we see here is that this is an address to others, founded on the experience of the psalmist. He had found protection from the Lord; he had had evidence of His goodness; and he asks now of others that they would make the same trial which he had made. It is the language of piety in view of personal experience; and it is such language as a young convert, whose heart is filled with joy as hope first dawns on his soul, would address to his companions and friends, and to all the world around; such language as one who has had any special comfort, or who has experienced any special deliverance from temptation or from trouble, would address to others. Lessons, derived from our own experience, we may properly recommend to others; the evidence which has been furnished us that God is good, we may properly employ in persuading others to come and taste his love.


The promises relative to enjoyments in this life are the grand tests of Divine revelation. These must be fulfilled to all them who with deep repentance and true faith turn unto the Lord, if the revelation which contains them be of God. Let any man in this spirit approach his Maker, and plead the promises that are suited to his case, and he will soon know whether the doctrine be of God. He shall taste, and then see, that the Lord is good, and that the man is blessed who trusts in him. This is what is called experimental religion; the living, operative knowledge that a true believer has that he is passed from death unto life; that his sins are forgiven him for Christ’s sake, the Spirit himself bearing witness with his spirit that he is a child of God. And, as long as he is faithful, he carries about with him the testimony of the Holy Ghost; and he knows that he is of God, by the Spirit which God has given him.

Have a Great and God filled Day

Pastor C


Stand Fast

Category : General

Philippians 4: 1 (KJV)
1Therefore, my brethren dearly beloved and longed for, my joy and crown, so stand fast in the Lord, my dearly beloved.

Here we find that after the pattern of those worthy of imitation as was laid out earlier. The expression or exhortation “So stand fast in the Lord.” is noteworthy. The apostle having pointed out the dignity of Christian citizenship and the exalted conduct befitting those possessing its privileges, he now exhorts them to steadfastness in imitating those who, through evil and good report and in the midst of opposition and suffering, had bravely maintained their loyalty to Christ. “So stand fast”; be sincere and earnest in devotion to God, as they were: be faithful and unflinching, as they were; triumph over the world, the flesh, and the devil, as they did. “Behold, we count them worthy who endure;” and the same distinction of character is attainable by every follower of Christ, attainable by patient continuance in well-doing. The ideal of a steadfast character is embodied in the Lord, who was Himself a supreme example of unfaltering obedience and love. We are told to follow Him; being united to Him by faith, deriving continual inspiration and strength from His Spirit, stand fast in Him. It said that while riding up to a regiment that was hard pressed at Waterloo, the Duke of Wellington cried to the men, “Stand fast, Ninety-fifth! What will they say in England?” History records how successfully the appeal was obeyed. Stand fast, Christians! What will they say in the heavenly city to which you belong, and for whose interests you are fighting? William of Orange said he learnt a word while crossing the English Channel which he would never forget. When in a great storm the captain was all night crying out to the man at the helm, “Steady! steady! steady!


We cannot help being a little surprised at this; for, as Boice said, “If we were writing the passage and were using Paul’s image, we should likely speak of invasion, marching or conquest. Paul does not do that, but speaks correctly of standing!” It has been pointed out that Christ conquers new territory; his followers stand firm in holding what Christ gains. This is not the only possible analogy of Christian evangelism, but it is surely one. Perhaps, in the personal sector, this is the most important analogy; because the great challenge for the Christian is not that of overcoming someone else with a knowledge of the truth but with himself standing faithfully for the Lord until life’s end.

Have a Great and God filled Day

Pastor C


A Just God

Category : General

Romans 9: 15 (KJV)
15 For he saith to Moses, I will have mercy on whom I will have mercy, and I will have compassion on whom I will have compassion.

It is said that salvation in its beginning, its progress, and its close, is of him. He has a right, therefore, to bestow it when and where he pleases. All our mercies flow from his mere love and compassion, and not from our deserts.


These words are said by God when He declared expressly that He would make all His goodness pass before Moses Exodus 33:19. It shows that God has a right to dispense His blessings as He pleases; for, after He had declared that He would spare the Jews of old, and continue them in the relation of His peculiar people, when they had deserved to have been cut off for their idolatry, He said: I will make all my goodness pass before thee; and I will proclaim the name of the Lord before thee; and I will have mercy on whom I will have mercy; and I will have compassion on whom I will have compassion. As if He had said: I will make such a display of my perfections as shall convince you that My nature is kind and beneficent; but know, that I am a debtor to none of My creatures. My benefits and blessings are merely from My own good will: nor can any people, much less a rebellious people, challenge them as their due in justice or equity. And therefore, I now spare the Jews; not because either you, who intercede for them or they themselves have any claim upon My favor, but of My own free and sovereign grace I choose to show them mercy and compassion. I will give my salvation in My own way and on My own terms. He that believeth on my Son Jesus shall be saved; and he that believeth not shall be damned. This is God’s ultimate design; this purpose he will never change; and this he has fully declared in the everlasting Gospel. This is the grand Decree of re-probation and election.


Therefore, it was regarded, not as a proof of stern and inexorable justice, but as “the very proof of his benevolence,” and the highest which he thought proper to exhibit. When people, therefore, under the influence of an non-renewed and hos the heart, charge this as an unjust and arbitrary proceeding, they are resisting and perverting what God regards as the very demonstration of his benevolence. The sense of the passage clearly is, that he would choose the objects of his favor, and bestow his mercies as he chose. None of the human race deserved his favor; and he had a right to pardon whom he pleased, and to save people on his own terms, and according to his sovereign will and pleasure.


Someone may then question the morality of this, but the idea here is that as God is speaking of situations requiring mercy and compassion. He is not bound by any moral requirement. In the nature of the case no one can be seen as deserving of mercy and compassion. The whole point of mercy and compassion is that they override the demands of justice. The sum is, if God show mercy to some, and not to others, he cannot be accused of injustice, because he injures none; nor is he obliged or indebted to any.

Have a Great and God filled Day

Pastor C


No E-Z Pass

Category : General

Romans 2: 9 (KJV)
9 Tribulation and anguish, upon every soul of man that doeth evil, of the Jew first, and also of the Gentile;

This is a general principle, and it is clear that in this respect God would deal with the Jew as he does with the Gentile. This general principle the apostle is establishing, that he may bring it to bear on the Jew, and to show that he cannot escape simply because he is a Jew.


“To him that worketh not,” which Paul was to write in Romans 4:5, must be understood in conjunction with these verses where “worketh evil” and “worketh good” dogmatically are affirmed to be the basis of being saved or being lost. They cover exactly the same ground, but in the reverse order. In the previous two verses, the patient seekers of eternal life are contrasted with them that obey unrighteousness; and in these two verses, the soul that worketh evil is mentioned first and contrasted with him that worketh good. It is as though Paul had written: “Take it either going or coming, the judgment will be based upon what people do, whether or not they obey the Lord.” But more appears here in the repeated mention of “the Jew first (For the time is come for judgment to begin at the house of God: and if it begins first at us, what shall be the end of them that obey not the gospel? And if the righteous is scarcely saved, where shall the ungodly and sinner appear? (1 Peter 4:17).


Here we are to understand that there will be misery of all descriptions, without the possibility of escape, will this righteous Judge inflict upon every impenitent sinner. The Jew first, as possessing greater privileges, and having abused greater mercies; and also on the Gentile, who, though he had not the same advantages, had what God saw was sufficient for his state; and, having sinned against them, shall have punishment proportioned to his demerit. In this place, ‘the Jew first’ must mean the Jew principally, and implies that the Jew is more accountable than the Gentile, and will be punished according to his superior light; for as the Jew will have received more than the Gentile, he will also be held more culpable before the Divine tribunal, and will consequently be more severely punished. His privileges will aggravate his culpability, and increase his punishment. ‘You only have I known of all the families of the earth; therefore I will punish you for all your iniquities,’ Amos 3:2; Matthew 11:22; Luke 12:47. But although the judgment will begin with the Jew, and on him be more heavily executed, it will not terminate with him, but will be also extended to the Gentile, who will be found guilty, though not with the same aggravation.

Have a Great and God filled Day

Pastor C


The Practice of Forgiveness

Category : General

Proverbs 17: 9 (KJV)
9He that covereth a transgression seeketh love; but he that repeateth a matter separateth very friends.

“To be a Christian means to forgive the inexcusable because God has forgiven the inexcusable in you.” ― C.S. Lewis

It is noted, “A man of opposite character is a curse to his race. Friendship is the greatest boon of human existence, and he whose words or deeds tend to break any such tie does his fellow-men a great wrong. There is no more effectual way of doing it than by a constant repetition of the faults of others, either by reminding the offender himself of his shortcomings or by speaking of them to a third person.” Solomon may refer to either of these habits and both are bad, and show a disposition entirely opposed to that of Him who, when he forgave His ancient people, promised that He would “remember their sin no more

The way to preserve peace among relations and neighbors is to make the best of everything, not to tell others what has been said or done against them when it is not at all necessary to their safety, nor to take notice of what has been said or done against them when it is not at all necessary to their safety, nor to take notice of what has been said or done against ourselves, but to excuse both, and put the best construction upon them. “It was an oversight; therefore, overlook it. It was done through forgetfulness; therefore, forget it. It perhaps made nothing of you; do you make nothing of it.” The ripping up of faults is the ripping out of love, and nothing tends more to the separating of friends, and setting them at variance, than the repeating of matters that have been in variance; for they commonly lose nothing in the repetition, but the things themselves are aggravated and the passions about them revived and exasperated. The best method of peace is by an amnesty or act of oblivion.

It is the glory of a righteous person not to judge and criticize others; and it is always a mark of forbearance and kindness to ignore sins and mistakes that appear in the lives of others, especially, in this context, those of a close friend or associate. “He that harpeth on a matter” refers to the mention over and over again of a close friend’s alleged error. Such action is extremely irritating and should be absolutely avoided.

“Forgiveness is an act of the will, and the will can function regardless of the temperature of the heart.” ― Corrie Ten Boom

Have a Great and God filled Day

Pastor C


Finding Comfort in Christ

Category : General

2 Corinthians 1: 3 (KJV)
3 Blessed be God, even the Father of our Lord Jesus Christ, the Father of mercies, and the God of all comfort;

Our sorrows are all, like ourselves, mortal. There are no immortal sorrows for immortal souls. They come, but blessed be God, they also go. Like birds of the air, they fly over our heads. But they cannot make their abode in our souls. We suffer today, but we shall rejoice tomorrow.”- Charles Spurgeon


Paul begins with justifying his former letter to them which had afflicted them, (2 Corinthians 7:7-8.) by telling them that he thanks God for his deliverance out of his afflictions, because it enables him to comfort them, by the example both of his affliction and deliverance, acknowledging the obligation that he had to them and others, for their prayers, and for their thanks for his deliverance; which he presumes they could not but put up for him, since his conscience bears him witness (which was his comfort) that, in his behavior to all men, and to them more especially, he had been direct and sincere, without any selfish or carnal interest; and that what he wrote to them had no other design than what lay open, and they read in his words,—and did also acknowledge, and he doubted not but they would always acknowledge, (part of them doing so already,) that he was their minister and apostle, in whom they rejoiced; as they would, he trusted, be his rejoicing in the day of the Lord, 2 Corinthians 1:3-14.

This is the commencement properly of the Epistle, and it is the language of a heart that is full of joy, and that bursts forth with gratitude in view of mercy. It may have been excited by the recollection that he had formerly written to them, and that during the interval which had elapsed between the time when the former Epistle was written and when this was penned, he had been called to a most severe trial, and that from that trial he had been mercifully delivered. With a heart full of gratitude and joy for this merciful interposition, he commences this Epistle. It is remarked by Doddridge, that 11 out of the 13 epistles of Paul, begin with exclamations of praise, joy, and thanksgiving. Paul had been afflicted, but he had also been favored with remarkable consolations, and it was not unnatural that he should allow himself to give expression to his joy and praise in view of all the mercies which God had conferred on him. This entire passage is one that is exceedingly valuable, as showing that there may be elevated joy in the midst of deep affliction, and as showing what is the reason why God visits his servants with trials.


it was noted, “Keep God’s covenant in your trials; hold you by His blessed word, and sin not; flee anger, wrath, grudging, envying, fretting; forgive a hundred pence to your fellow-servant, because your Lord hath forgiven you ten thousand talents: for, I assure you by the Lord, your adversaries shall get no advantage against you, except you sin, and offend your Lord, in your sufferings.”—Samuel Rutherford

Have a Great and God filled Day

Pastor C


He is Risen

Category : General

1 Corinthians 15: 14 (KJV)
14 And if Christ be not risen, then is our preaching vain, and your faith is also vain.

Ask people today what the gospel is, as I have suggested, and this is often what they will say, “Well, Jesus lived and died.” No, that is not the gospel. Everyone believes that Jesus died. Every humanistic philosophy today accepts the fact that Jesus died. But there is no good news in that. The good news is Christ died for our sins according to the Scriptures. That is the good news, that his death accomplished something for us. It changed us, it delivered us, it set us free. That death had great significance in the mind and heart and eyes of God, and that is the good news. As Peter puts it in his words, “He himself bore our sins in his body on the tree,” (1 Peter 2:24). Or, to use the words of Isaiah, “He was wounded for our transgressions, he was bruised for our iniquities: the chastisement of our peace was upon him; and with his stripes we are healed,” (Isaiah 53:5 KJV).

However, if Jesus did not rise again from the dead, we are in trouble. In 1 Cor 15:12-20, Paul tells us the consequences of having a dead Messiah. If Jesus is dead, then we have no hope. If Jesus is dead, we are wasting our time here today. If Jesus is dead, I am more of a fool than people already think I am. If Jesus is dead there is no heaven, there is no salvation, there is no forgiveness, there is no hope, there is no future, there is no reason to live. If Jesus is dead, then we are all headed to Hell. If Jesus is dead, God help us, for we will face His awful wrath in Hell forever! I am thankful to God, Jesus isn’t dead! The message of the angel still reverberates down the corridors of time. It tells us this resurrection day morning that “He is not here, for He is risen, as He said.” Thank God, He lives! Because He lives, there is hope. There salvation. There is a Friend that “sticketh closer than a brother.” There is forgiveness of sin. There is grace to live for God, to be saved, to face whatever comes our way, and to die. Because He lives life for the believer is not in vain, but it will end in glory in His exalted presence. Because He lives, there is hope for the lost sinner; he can run to Jesus and find a willing Savior.

That is the good news, that God did something for us in that marvelous event of the cross. As we contemplate the cross, and the dying of Jesus in our place, we see that the good news of it is that God takes it seriously, and he is prepared to treat us in an entirely different way than we deserve to be treated on the basis of the death of Jesus on our behalf. That is the good news. There on the cross, we are told, he dealt with our failures, he dealt with our rebellion, he dealt with our sinful, guilty lives. He did something about it so that besmirched and dark and stained past does not any longer need trouble us. It has been set aside by the death of Jesus, and with that fact we enter into hope and freedom.

The resurrection of Jesus changes the face of death for all His people. Death is no longer a prison, but a passage into God’s presence. Easter says you can put truth in a grave, but it won’t stay there. Clarence W. Hall

Have a Great and God filled Resurrection Sunday

Pastor C


Father Forgive them

Category : General

St. Luke 23: 34 (KJV)
34Then said Jesus, Father, forgive them; for they know not what they do. And they parted his raiment, and cast lots.

This was the first of the seven utterances of Jesus from the cross; and it has the utility of indicating two centers of forgiveness, one on the earth, the other in heaven.

If ignorance does not excuse a crime, it at least diminishes the atrocity of it. What was their ignorance, who crucified Christ? Ignorance is two-fold, simple or respective. Simple ignorance is not supportable in these persons, for in many things they were a knowing people. But it was a respective particular ignorance, “Blindness in part is happened to Israel” (Romans 11:25). They knew many other truths, but did not know Jesus Christ. In that their eyes were held.


Though they had the Scriptures among them, they misunderstood them, and did not rightly measure Christ by that right rule. However, these persons well knew that they were crucifying an innocent man; but they did not know that, by this act of theirs, they were bringing down on themselves and on their country the heaviest judgments of God. In the prayer, Father, forgive them! that word of prophecy was fulfilled, He made intercession for the transgressors, Isa.53:12


This prayer included many. It included all who had any share in the mockery, and crucifixion, and death of Christ. It included the. Roman governor, who had given authority to crucify Him; the Roman soldiers, whose duty it was to see the sentence carried out into execution; the Jewish priests and rulers, who cried out for judgment; the multitude, who were stirred up by their religious guides and rulers. All these various classes were ignorant of the true nature of the deed which they were committing, but all were not equally ignorant. Some knew more than others; and according to their greater knowledge was their guilt, according to their ignorance was their personal share in the prayer offered at the cross.


There is a strong duty of praying for our enemies, even when they are endeavoring most to injure us. The thing for which we should pray for them is that “God” would pardon them and give them better minds. The power and excellence of the Christian religion. No other religion “teaches” people to pray for the forgiveness of enemies; no other “disposes” them to do it. Men of the world seek for “revenge;” the Christian bears reproaches and persecutions with patience, and prays that God would pardon those who injure them, and save them from their sins. By this expression Christ gave evidence that he was that mild and gentle lamb, which was to be led out to be sacrificed, as Isaiah the prophet had foretold, (Isaiah 53:7.) For not only does He abstain from revenge, but pleads with God the Father for the salvation of those by whom He is most cruelly tormented.

Have a Great and God filled Day

Pastor C