Monthly Archives: March 2019

God our Source of strength

Category : General

2 Corinthians 1: 9 (KJV)
9But we had the sentence of death in ourselves, that we should not trust in ourselves, but in God which raiseth the dead.

Life is full of twists and turns and sometimes we fall upon hard times. No matter what the circumstance we can rest in the fact that God is always faithful. He will hold us in the hollow of His hand and when we ask, He will help us through the hard times.

This is an exceedingly beautiful and important sentiment. It teaches that in the time to which Paul refers, he was in so great danger, and had so certain a prospect of death, that he could put no reliance on himself. He felt that he must die; and that human aid was vain. According to every probability he would die; and all that he could do was to cast himself on the protection of that God who had power to save him even then, if he chose, and who, if he did it, would exert power similar to that which is put forth when the dead are raised. The effect, therefore, of the near prospect of death was to lead him to put increased confidence in God. He felt that God only could save him; or that God only could sustain him if he should die. Perhaps also he means to say that the effect of this was to lead him to put increased confidence in God after his deliverance; not to trust in his own plans, or to confide in his own strength; but to feel that all that he had was entirely in the hands of God.
Paul treasured the awful experience through which he had passed for the great lesson which it reinforced; namely, that one’s trust should never be in himself but in the Lord, even God who raises the dead. By this reference to raising the dead, there is brought into view the passage in Heb.11:19, in which Abraham’s offering of Isaac was enabled through his confidence that God was able to raise the dead. Where else in all the Bible is Abraham’s reliance upon God’s ability to raise the dead even hinted at? And how did Paul know it? He himself had trusted God in the same manner when death loomed as a certainty, and at a time when many of God’s promises to the blessed apostle were as yet unfilled.
Many before us have been tried with many difficult situations, but trust God to be faithful to deliver them. And while we do not know our courses, nor what work God hath in his eternal counsels laid out for us, and therefore cannot be confident of deliverance in this life by the Almighty power of God; but yet we, under our greatest trials, may trust in God, who will certainly raise us from the dead; of which faith we have an instance in Job, Job 19:25-27. Moreover, for our comfort in our distresses we may observe that God, in His great deliverance of His people, use to suffer them first to be brought to the greatest extremities; that in the mount of the Lord it may be seen, and that they may learn to know that their salvation are from Him; more from His Almighty power, than from the virtue of any means they can use. Let us therefore learn, that the almighty power of God sometimes works beyond all creature expectations, beyond all human probabilities, beyond all rational conjectures, to help and deliver his people in hopeless and helpless trouble. This is a common, and a happy effect of the near prospect of death to a Christian; and it is well to contemplate the effect on such a mind as that of Paul in the near prospect of dying, and to see how instinctively then it clings to God. As believers in Jesus Christ in such or any circumstances let us always rush to His arms where we know and have the assurance that we will always be safe.

Have a Great and God filled Day

Pastor C


Finding Hope in God

Category : General

Jeremiah 17: 5 (KJV)
5 Thus saith the LORD; Cursed be the man that trusteth in man, and maketh flesh his arm, and whose heart departeth from the LORD.

We are made to understand that the Jews were given to worldly policies and thought to make themselves strong by the friendship of the Egyptians, (Isaiah 31:3) and strangers and in the meantime did not depend on God, and therefore he denounces God’s plagues against them, showing that they prefer corruptible man to God, who is immortal, (Isaiah 2:22) ; (Jer.48:6-7). Their hope was in man.
The condemnation on them was one of rejection. As the Jews did in the Egyptians and Assyrians; and in Abraham their father, and in being his seed, as they did in Christ’s time; and which was trusting in the flesh; and as all such may be said to do who trust in their natural descent from good men, Matthew 3:9, they also trusted in Moses, in the law of Moses, and in their having, hearing, and obeying it; which pronounces every man cursed that does not perfectly perform it: they trusted in themselves, and in their own righteousness; despised others, and rejected Christ and his righteousness; and brought an anathema upon them, John 5:45 and all such that trust in their own hearts, and in their own works, trust in man, in the creature, in creature acts, and involve themselves in the curse here denounced. The Jews also, to this day, expect the Messiah to come as a mere man, and so trust in him as such; and all those that call themselves Christians, and take Christ to be a mere creature, as the Arians, and a mere man, as the Socinians, may be said to trust in man, and entail a curse upon themselves; though we trust in Christ, yet not as a man, but as he is the true and living God.
We also see that ‘Flesh’ here is to be taken for man, as we may easily gather from the context. It was a common thing with the Hebrews to state the same thing twice: In the first clause man is mentioned, and in the second flesh: and arm means power or help. The meaning is, that all are accursed who trust in man. But the word flesh is no doubt added in the second line by way of contempt, according to what is done in Isaiah 31:3, where the Prophet says, “The Egyptian is man and not God, flesh and not spirit.” He calls the Egyptians flesh by way of contempt, as though he had said that there was nothing strong or firm in them, and that the aid which the Jews expected from them would be evanescent. So, it is in this place, though the Prophet, according to the common usage, repeats in the second clause what he had said in the first, he yet expresses something more, that men are extremely sottish when they place their salvation in a thing of naught; for, as we have said, there is nothing solid or enduring in flesh. As men therefore quickly vanish away, what can be more foolish than to seek safety from them?
Here in Jer.17:5 God sternly warns against placing our dependency on man and calls it a curse. Today, more and more people are finding themselves alone and depressed, and few of us have not at one time, or another felt the sting of despondency and despair. But Good news! Help is available, not the kind the world has, wherein it wishes for the best. It is one thing to wish, and quite another to have faith based on the promises of God. Let us then know that all those who place the least portion of their hope in men do in part depart from God, and therefore turn aside from him. In short, the Holy Spirit declares, briefly indeed, but very solemnly, that all are apostates and deserters from God who turn to men and fix their hope in them. But if this declaration be true as to the present life, when we treat of eternal life, it is doubtless a twofold madness if we ascribe it, even in the smallest degree, either to our own righteousness or to any other virtues. He who looks for aid from men is pronounced accursed by God, even when he expects from them what belongs to this frail life, which soon vanishes; but when we hope for eternal life and the inheritance of heaven from ourselves or from other creatures, how much more detestable it is? Let us then observe this inference, so that the truth taught here by the Prophet may keep us dependent on God only.

Have a Great and God filled Day

Pastor C


Our Hope is in God

Category : General

Romans 15: 13 (KJV)
13 Now the God of hope fill you with all joy and peace in believing, that ye may abound in hope, through the power of the Holy Ghost.

It has been said, “All men desire to be happy; but very few obtain the happiness which they covet. All happiness, except that of the Christian, is but counterfeit. It is like the morning cloud and early dew. Yet even the true Christian often falls short of the blessedness which he might enjoy..”
The prayer contained in this verse reminds us that there is no blessing which does not come to us from God, James 1:17. He is called the God of love, of peace, of patience, of consolation, of hope, who fills His people with joy and peace. If, then, we desire to be filled with joy and peace, we must look to God. If we desire to abound in hope by the power of the Holy Ghost, we must with confidence pray to obtain His sacred influences and Divine teaching. We must be careful not to grieve Him by our evil conduct and evil desires.
It is important for us to know and understand that the inward joy and peace of the Christian are the gifts of God, and not the natural effects of anything in the mind of man. All the promises and declarations of Scripture would fail in producing joy and peace in the mind of a sinner, were it not for the agency of the Spirit of God. If the Christian possesses joy and peace, he ought to ascribe it altogether to God. He ought to reflect that these blessings must be produced and continually maintained by Divine power, and not by any power of his own mind. It should always be kept in view that these fruit of the Spirit, first of joy, and next of peace, Galatians 5:22, cannot be produced except in connection with the other fruit of the Spirit, and in the way of obedience, and in carefully abstaining from grieving the Spirit.
This is in opposition to what the world says and thinks. Worldly hope rests upon favoring circumstances–our own powers. It hangs often upon a slender thread. “Hope centered in that child.” How often parents with broken hearts have said that. Few are atheists in theory, but many are such in their feelings. They are hopeless because they are godless. On the other hand, the Christian is first of all a believer in God as revealed in Christ. God therefore is the giver and the foundation of his hope.
God is called the God of hope, because He is the author of all the well-grounded hope of His people. All hope of which He is not the author, in the heart of men, is false and delusive. The world in general may have hope, but it is false hope. All true hope with respect to the Divine favor is effected in the human heart by God Himself. Not only is God the author of all true hope, but He can create this hope out of the midst of despair. The most responding are often raised by Him to a good hope through grace; and the guiltiest are in a moment relieved, and made to hope in His mercy. How remarkably was this the case with the thief on the cross, and with the three thousand on the day of Pentecost!
Our hope is not a selfish emotion. God never inspires us with any sort of selfishness, not even with religious selfishness. The hope we cherish, if it reflects the spirit of Christ, will be large-hearted. It will rest upon “the God of Hope,” as the God who rules over all the world. It is an exclusively Christian possession. Such is the unavoidable inference from the text and must be concluded that individuals who are not Christians are “without God and without hope.”

Have a Great and God filled Day

Pastor C


Walking in God’s Path

Category : General

Proverbs 4: 18 (KJV)
18But the path of the just is as the shining light, that shineth more and more unto the perfect day.

It has been pointed out that “The just man here is not the man who merely begins, it is the man who perseveres. This man’s path is no meteor, which gleams and expires; no rising day, lowering into mist and darkness; it is the path of the cloudless light of heaven. Persevering piety is as the light that shineth more and more.”
In order for us to understand somewhat the force of this divinely beautiful sentence, we must call to mind that our condition in this world in the sight of Almighty God is very frequently spoken of as that of travelers on their journey; and our life altogether is represented as a way—a path—a progress. The text is said to be a kind of parable setting before us with the thoughts of travelers setting out on a journey very early in the morning, when there is a faint streak of light in the eastern sky; at first quite faint, but by degrees it grows brighter and brighter, till at last the sun rises above the horizon, and the “perfect day” begins.
The writer is reminding us that the essentials of a just man’s character have been in all ages the same. The path, the life-course, of such a man, is like the shining light. I do not think that the path of the justified is compared to the course of the sun, from the period of his appearance in the morning to the time of his meridian height. The sun is an emblem, not of the justified, but of the Justifier. The just are those whom the Sun of Righteousness shines upon. The “just” man is one that is made righteous through the righteousness of Christ imputed to him; and who is created anew in Christ, in righteousness and true holiness; and, under the influence of divine grace, lives soberly, righteously, and godly. The “path” he is directed to walk in, and does, is Christ himself, the way, the truth, and the life; through whose blood, righteousness, and sacrifice, he goes to God for grace and mercy, for peace, pardon, and acceptance, for fresh supplies of grace, and in order to enjoy communion with him; and who also is the way of salvation, and to eternal life and happiness: and, besides this grand and principal path, there are the paths of truth, righteousness, and holiness; the path of duty and obedience; the way of the commandments of God, and ordinances of Christ: and this path he walks in, whether of grace or duty, is “as the shining light”; or of the morning, when the day first dawns, or at least when the sun rises.
Therefore, in essence, the righteous man possesses an understanding brightened by the rays of Divine truth, for the Sun of Righteousness hath shone into his soul. His heart is beautified by the light of purity, diffusing a pleasant luster around him in his conversation; and his spirit is cheered with the light of joy and consolation from the countenance of God. Just men daily grow in knowledge, and grace, and consolation, until all be perfected and swallowed up in glory. However, the path of the wicked is gloomy, dark, and dangerous; that of the righteous is open, luminous, and instructive. This verse contains a fine metaphor; it refers to the sun rising above the horizon, and the increasing twilight, till his beams shine full upon the earth.
As was observed, “God’s promises are like the star, the darker the night, the brighter they shine.” — D. Nicholas

Have a Great and God filled Day

Pastor C


God Knows our Pain

Category : General

James 5: 7 (KJV)
7Be patient therefore, brethren, unto the coming of the Lord….

It is said, “Affliction and suffering have been appointed by God as instruments He uses to make us more holy, to make us more like Jesus. They remind us that we are weak and we must rely not on ourselves, but on Jesus. They remind us that this world is not our home but that we are only passing through toward our real home in heaven with our Father, our Savior, Jesus Christ, and our Comforter, the Holy Spirit.”
The apostle here addresses himself to the poor who were oppressed by the rich men, and these he calls “brethren” of whom he was not ashamed; when he does not bestow this title upon the rich, though professors of the same religion. These poor brethren he advises to be patient under their sufferings, to bear them with patience, unto the coming of the Lord; not to destroy Jerusalem, but either at death, or at the last, judgment; when he will take vengeance on their oppressors, and deliver them from all their troubles, and put them into the possession of that kingdom, and glory, to which they are called; wherefore, in the meanwhile, he would have them be quiet and easy, not to murmur against God, nor seek to take vengeance on men, but leave it to God, to whom it belongs, who will judge his people.
These were doubtless suffering under those oppression’s, and his object was to induce them to bear their wrongs without murmuring and without resistance. One of the methods of doing this was by showing them, in an address to their rich oppressors, that those who injured and wronged them would be suitably punished at the day of judgment, or that their cause was in the hands of God; and another method of doing it was by the direct inculcation of the duty of patience. Matthew 5:38-41, 43-45. The margin here is, “be long patient,” or “suffer with long patience.” The sense of the Greek is, “be long-suffering, or let not your patience be exhausted. Your courage, vigor, and forbearance are not to be short-lived, but is to be enduring. Let it continue as long as there is need of it, even to the coming of the Lord. Then you will be released from sufferings.”
Patience is a sense of afflictions without murmuring, and of injuries without revenge. It is the duty of Christians to be patient under their sufferings, though they be long and sharp. Let us always remember that perseverance is a gift; a block of character. Perseverance grows in time, and often in the dark. Trusting that God’s lesson in Job is relevant to our own personal stories is key. The Lord is indeed full of compassion and mercy, even if we are currently sighing and groaning, resting only in our turmoil. As believers in Jesus Christ, while in and under our afflictions, to establish our hearts in a firm belief of the coming and appearance of Christ, who will put a final period to all our sufferings, and to reward our victorious faith and patience. So, let us hold on to Christ a little while longer.

Have a Great and God filled Day

Pastor C


Humility in the Body

Category : General

Romans 12: 3 (KJV)
3 For I say, through the grace given unto me, to every man that is among you, not to think of himself more highly than he ought to think; but to think soberly, according as God hath dealt to every man the measure of faith.

It is noted that ‘Abraham Lincoln may be accepted as one who in this latter day has accomplished great things. He is among the nation-makers. He was brave, sagacious, loyal, vigorous; but readers of his life are most struck by his freedom from self-regard. He felt no malice, he asserted no rights, and took no vengeance, yet he controlled mighty passions, and in the midst of war sowed the seeds of peace.’
Humility is the pre-eminent Christian virtue. Pagan teachers required their followers to be brave, just, and true, but over all as a sort of guard Christianity sets humility.
It has been concluded that the expression to every man that is among you, would be superfluous, if it were merely intended to denote the members of the church present at Rome. It is necessary to give the words: every man that is, a more special and forcible meaning: “Every man that is in office, engaged in ministry in some form or other among you; every one that plays a part int he life of the church.” See the enumeration which follows. Perhaps the apostle is led to use this expression by his own absence from Rome. He who with his apostolic gift is absent, addresses all those who, being present, can exercise an influence on the progress of the church, to say to them on what condition this influence shall be a blessed one.— “to aspire beyond one’s measure.” The measure of each man is denoted by the words: that which he has a right to claim. In the believer’s case it consists in his wishing only to be that which God, by the gift committed to him, calls him to be. The gift received should be the limit of every man’s claim and action, for it is thereby that the will of God regarding him is revealed (Romans 12:2).
In this verse, Paul was still dealing with the problem of getting a new mind into Christians. Paradoxically, even the great spiritual emoluments of Christian service, the achievement of a degree of human righteousness, as viewed by human eyes, the gaining of respectability and reputation among fellow mortals, all of the rewards and honors of godly living, even such things as these, quite easily, and often do, lead to pride, conceit, arrogance, and self-righteousness, which are totally abhorrent to God. It cannot be doubted that this very fact led to the fantastic emphasis in this epistle to the effect that nobody, but nobody, ever deserved salvation.
In the work of mutual ministry within the Church there is something for every member to perform. The appeal is “to every man that is among you.” The Church is “one body in Christ,” “everyone” being a “member” of some kind, and having his proper office. Every member, organ, nerve, vein, bone, ligament has its proper function in the natural body; and as soon as any one fails, there ensues that disturbance of the harmonic activity which we call disease. In the Church, Christ is the Head, the Centre of life, intelligence, and authority, and His Holy Spirit the organic principle. But every individual believer has his own proper sphere of influence and activity for the general good (Ephesians 4:15-16). If he neglects that ministry, not only will he himself suffer damage or excision, but the body also will suffer loss thereby.

Have a Great and God filled Day

Pastor C


Being Powered by God

Category : General

Ephesians 6: 10 (KJV)
10Finally, my brethren, be strong in the Lord, and in the power of his might.

“It often requires a braver man to say “No,” than to take the Cashmere Gate at Delhi. Perfect courage consists in doing without a witness all that we could do if the whole world were looking on.”
Friends, if we are going to be victorious in the spiritual battles we face, we are going to need spiritual power. The problem is, none of us possess spiritual power within ourselves. We are weak, frail, fallible, foolish creatures, and we are often on the losing side of the battles of life. If we hope to achieve victory, we must have true spiritual power. This verse tells us where that power originates.
Here we find that Paul having laid before his reader, their great and high calling, and all the doctrines and precepts of the Gospel, it was necessary that he should show them the enemies that will oppose them, and the strength which is requisite to enable them to repel them. The admonition Paul was about to give here had been in mind throughout the epistle. He mentioned the strength of God (Ephesians 1:19; 3:16) and the putting on of “the new man” (Ephesians 4:24) earlier; but now he would give final instructions for arming the Christian for the warfare against the forces which opposed him. “The cosmic purpose of God involves the believer with the spiritual hierarchy of the unseen world organized under the power of Satan and his influences.
The believers of Ephesus were told that they must have strength, and strength of a spiritual kind, and such strength too as the Lord himself can furnish; and they must have this strength through an indwelling God, the power of His might working in them. He was not unaware that in the discharge of their duties they would need strength from above. He knew that they had great and mighty foes, and that to meet them, they needed to be clothed in the panoply of the Christian soldier. He closes, therefore, by exhorting them to put on all the strength which they could to meet the enemies with which they had to contend; and in the commencement of his exhortation he reminds them that it was only by the strength of the Lord that they could hope for victory.
There is good reason for our being so often advised in the Scriptures to “be strong.” Christian character has two sides. We cease to do evil. We also learn to do well. But doing well is impossible if we are not strong. The forces of evil are many and mighty. Life is short. The love of ease is deep rooted. Unless we are strong, we effect nothing. Our lives shall be mere bundles of resolves never effected, collections of impotent wishes that never come to anything.
Spiritual power can only be ours through a relationship with Jesus Christ. This means that just as we trust Jesus and His death and resurrection to save us, we must trust Him to give us the spiritual power we so desperately need. Just as we need His righteousness to enter into God’s Heaven, we need His power if we are going to stand against the attacks we face in life. Just as we need His blood to take away our sins, we need His power to defeat Satan. If the Lord aids us by His mighty power, we have no reason to shrink from the combat. But it will be asked, What purpose did it serve to enjoin the Ephesians to be strong in the Lord’s mighty power, which they could not of themselves accomplish? In a difficult, hostile and indifferent society, Christian strength is a subject which needs emphasizing. A strength that only comes from Jehovah God.

Have a Great and God filled Day!

Pastor C


God’s Comfort in Difficult Times

Category : General

Psalm 119: 76 (KJV)
76 Let, I pray thee, thy merciful kindness be for my comfort, according to thy word unto thy servant.

It has been observed that, “In the Word in which God offers his mercy, there is to be found no small comfort for healing all the grief to which men are liable.”
David was exposed to many and severe trials: and, if he had not been favored with peculiar supports, he would have sunk under them. This he often mentions in 1 Samuel 30:6 and Psalms 116:3-5. Also, confiding in the Divine promise, he already cherished in his heart a joy, proceeding from the hope of receiving the communications of Divine grace. But as all our hope would end in mere disappointment, did not God at length appear as our deliverer, he requests the performance of that which God had promised him. Similarly, we notice Paul also acknowledges his obligation to God for the same supports 2 Corinthians 1:3-5. Moreover, when such manifestations were withdrawn, even Jesus himself almost fainted (Matthew 27:46). And although he has acknowledged that he had been justly humbled, yet he desires that his sorrow may be alleviated by some consolation. He implores God’s mercy, as what was essentially necessary to relieve and cure his miseries. He thus shows that nothing can remove sorrow from the faithful, until they feel that God is reconciled to them.
The names and number of those that have been helped as revealed in Scriptures as well in history is innumerable. How many have the blessings of health and wealth, who taste nothing of God’s loving-kindness in them, but make them the occasions of more flagrant opposition to His will! How many have been restored to health, who by their subsequent misconduct have turned that mercy into a real curse! Above all, how many have made Christ Himself a stumbling-block instead of a Savior, and “the gospel a savor of death,” when it might have been to them “a savor of life!” Thus, would all men do, if they were left to themselves: even Hezekiah’s miraculous recovery, and Paul’s visit to the third heavens, would have issued only in their deeper condemnation, if God had not given grace to the one, and “a thorn in the flesh” to the other, to counteract the propensities of their fallen nature. Well then might David make this a matter of prayer to God, when none but God could impart to him this benefit.
Let me say that it is no light matter to abuse the merciful kindness of God. The day is coming, when every mercy we have received, must be accounted for; because when it does, as the Scriptures says, “it will be more tolerable for Sodom and Gomorrah than for those” who have slighted a preached gospel.
Friends every mercy therefore should be received with a holy fear and jealousy, lest it should prove only an occasion of more aggravated guilt, and heavier condemnation. And let us more frequently reflect on the loving-kindness and goodness of God Psalms 26:3, 63:3. Also let us meditate on it especially in seasons of trouble Ps. 143:7-8. And let us endeavor to requite it by devoting ourselves unreservedly to His service.

Have a Great and God filled Day

Pastor C


Dead to Self, Alive to Christ

Category : General

Colossians 3: 5 (KJV)
5 Mortify therefore your members which are upon the earth; fornication, uncleanness, inordinate affection, evil concupiscence, and covetousness, which is idolatry:

“Mortify therefore your members which are upon the earth,” the expression is doubly unique. It is the only passage where “mortification”—the killing of anything in us—is enjoined; and it is also notable, as not explicitly distinguishing between the members themselves, and the evil of which they are made the instruments. Since you are dead to sin and the world, and are to appear with Christ in the glories of his kingdom, subdue every carnal and evil propensity of your nature. The word mortify means to put to death (Romans 8:13, Galatians 5:24), and the meaning here is that they were entirely to subdue their evil propensities, so that they would have no remains of life; that is, they were not at all to indulge them. We are to put them to death: the verb is used metaphorically to signify, to deprive a thing of its power, to destroy its strength. Use no member of your body to sin against God; keep all under dominion; and never permit the beast to run away with the man. To gratify any sensual appetite is to give it the very food and nourishment by which it lives, thrives, and is active. However, the body may suffer by excessive sensual indulgences, the appetite increases with the indulgence. Deny yourselves, and let reason rule; and the animal will not get the ascendancy over the rational man.
The word “members” here, refers to the different members of the body – as the seat of evil desires and passions. They were wholly to extirpate those evil passions which he specifies as having their seat in the various members of the earthly body.
Therefore, a Christian should set himself against, and endeavor to mortify and subdue, it having a sort of idolatry in it, drawing our love, our trust, our fear, our joy, from God, and placing the supremacy of our affections in and upon the creatures. True, the covetous man does not believe his money to be God; but by his inordinate loving of it; and fiduciary trusting in it he is as truly guilty of idolatry, as if he bowed his knee unto it: for God more regards the internal acts of the mind, than he doth the external acts of the body.

Have a Great and God filled Day

Pastor C


Jehovah is our Peace

Category : General

Mark 4: 39 (KJV)
39 And he arose, and rebuked the wind, and said unto the sea, Peace, be still. And the wind ceased, and there was a great calm

Augustine (400 A.D.) says, “We are sailing in this life as through a sea, and the wind rises, and storms of temptation are not wanting. Whence is this, save because Jesus is sleeping in thee, thy faith in Jesus is slumbering in thy heart? Rouse him, and say, Master, we perish. He will awaken, that is, thy faith will return to thee, and the danger will be over.”
Christ commanded the winds and waves to Be silent! Be still! There is uncommon majesty and authority in these words. Who but God could act thus? Perhaps this salvation of his disciples in the boat might be designed to show forth that protection and deliverance which Christ will give to his followers, however violently they may be persecuted by earth or hell.
The picture is one of total control. Here was One Who could control Himself and could control the elements. He had no fear of the wind or the sea, batter as they would, for He knew that they would obey His will. This is not just a miracle, this is a portrayal of the One Who is Lord of all. Of One Who rules the power of the sea (Psalms 89:9). And we may surmise that Mark deliberately used ‘sea’ rather than ‘lake’ to make this connection. ‘He rebuked the wind and said to the sea.’ Psalms 106:9, ‘He rebuked the Red Sea also and it was dried up’; Isaiah 50:2, ‘Behold, at my rebuke I dry up the sea’; Nahum 1:4, ‘The Lord has His way in the whirlwind and the storm, and the clouds are the dust of His feet. He rebukes the sea and makes it dry —.’ Here in each case is the voice of the Creator speaking to His creation as in Genesis 1, rebuking it and bringing about His will. In none of these cases is there the suggestion of a demonic element. Even inanimate nature responded to His voice (Genesis 1:6-7). Now here in this boat is the Son of God, and the same thing occurs. The sea obeys His word.
No words can exaggerate the value and importance of a calm mind. It is the basis of almost everything which is good. It is noted that this pictures a well-ordered reflections, meditation, influence, wise speech, right action, a safe youth, a life to purpose, a peaceful end, a holy, happy death, all em-bosom themselves in a calm mind. Circumstances, and the fiends of the pit, and the woes that waste the lives of men, over these He has been seen to triumph. But behind all that we strive with here, there lurks the last enemy, and he also shall be subdued.
Let us have the confidence in remembering that the LORD we serve still has that same power today, Matt. 28:18; Gen. 18:14; Eph. 3:20. Your storm is no problem for Him! He can silence it with a word, if He so desires. He may, however, desire to allow the storm to rage. When He does this, He is well able to protect you in the midst of the storm. (Shadrach, Meshach and Abednego – Dan. 3; Daniel in the lion’s den – Dan. 6). Just as He said, they passed over, Mark 5:1. They learned that He was as good as His Word! He still is! Everything He has promised He will do, Rom. 4:21; Heb. 6:18. He will not back away from any promise He has made recorded in the Bible! Let us always remember that when the Lord is in our vessel, we always have an advantage.

Have a Great and God filled Day

Pastor C